• Navajo Vice President Rex Lee Jim

    Navajo delegation calls repatriation efforts a success

    The Navajo delegation on a mission to Paris, led by Navajo Nation Vice President Rex Lee Jim was successful in their repatriation efforts of sacred Navajo masks that went on sale at an auction house by bidding and outright purchasing all seven sacred Navajo masks.

  • U.S. to pay Navajo Nation $554 million in largest settlement with single Indian tribe

    In the largest settlement with a single American Indian tribe, the Obama administration will pay the Navajo Nation $554 million to settle claims that the U.S. government has mismanaged funds and natural resources on the Navajo reservation for decades.

  • The Federal Budget Process

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Welcome to the Navajo Nation Washington Office

Founded in 1984 and located on Capitol Hill, the Navajo Nation Washington Office serves as the Navajo Nation's advocate with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. The NNWO monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, disseminates congressional and federal agencies' information, develops strategies and decisions concerning national policies and budgets that affect the Navajo Nation.

 

About Us

 

Who We Are

Learn more about the Navajo Nation

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Who We Are

Enter Washington, DC from any direction, on any road, and you will experience its most striking qualities--national monuments, world- renowned museums, and most importantly, the center of the United States political power.

The Navajo Nation has a storied history with the United States government that has resulted in a government-to-government relationship between the two sovereigns. This relationship finds its foundation in our sacred Treaty of 1868. Navajo leaders since then have been meeting with Washington, DC officials as sovereigns. 

As a result of this government-to-government relationship the Navajo Nation has found it necessary to continue the Navajo Nation's presence in Washington, DC and thus officially opened the Navajo Nation Washington Office in 1984.

The Washington Office monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, disseminates congressional and federal agencies’ information, develops strategies and decisions concerning national policies and budgets that affect the Navajo Nation. It also assists the Navajo Nation in developing legislative language and testimony.

The NNWO is located on Capitol Hill and serves as the Navajo Nation's advocate with Congress, the White House, and federal agencies. Since August 1984 our office has served as an extension of the Navajo Nation government to represent our concerns to the federal government and agencies.

Meet the team.

Clara Lee Pratte, Executive Director

 

Clara Pratte was confirmed by the Navajo Nation Council as Executive Director of the Navajo Nation Washington Office Jan. 25, 2012.

Originally from Lupton, Ariz., Pratte was the former National Director of the Office of Native American Affairs of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Ms. Pratte has extensive experience in small business development and took a leading role in Indian Country by helping small business owners and entrepreneurs secure financing, technical assistance, training and federal contracts.

Prior to joining the SBA, Ms. Pratte worked for the Navajo Nation Washington Office as a policy analyst and legislative liaison focusing on economic and community development, housing and education issues.

Previous to Navajo Nation, she was a trade specialist in the U.S. Foreign and Commercial Service at the Department of Commerce in the International Trade Administration. She counseled various U.S. companies on exporting. She also worked for the Office of the Chief Information Officer where she oversaw IT projects for the U.S. Foreign and Commercial Service and the Import Administration.

Ms. Pratte has a Bachelor of Science degree in business from the University of Arizona, and a Master of Science degree from Carnegie Mellon University at the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management. Her academic accolades include a H. John Heinz Tribal Affairs Fellow, Udall Foundation Congressional Fellow and a Presidential Management Fellow. In 2012, the Udall Foundation named Pratte as the first ever Terrence L. Bracy Distinguished Alumnus. The award recognizes outstanding contributions from Udall alumni in four principal areas of public service: conflict resolution, environmental work, tribal health care and tribal public policy.

Simon Boyce, Deputy Director

Mr. Boyce has worked for Navajo Nation Washington Office for the last seven years and serves as government & legislative affairs counsel. Mr. Boyce handles the energy, natural resources, and Navajo-Hopi Land portfolios. Simon has extensive experience in energy development and issue based advocacy on the local, federal, and tribal level.

Brian Quint, Government & Legislative Affairs Associate 

Mr. Boyce has worked for Navajo Nation Washington Office for the last seven years and serves as government & legislative affairs counsel. Mr. Boyce handles the energy, natural resources, and Navajo-Hopi Land portfolios. Simon has extensive experience in energy development and issue based advocacy on the local, federal, and tribal level.

Perry Riggs, Government & Legislative Affairs Associate

Perry Riggs is Navajo originally from Leupp, Arizona. His clan is Kinyaa’aanii (Towering House Clan) and born for Naakai Dine’e (Mexican Clan) and his maternal grandfathers are Tl’aashchi’i (Red Bottom People) and his paternal grandfathers are Tl’izilani (Many Goats). 

Perry has been a practicing attorney for about 14 years and he comes to work with us from the Gila River Indian Community.

He has also worked as majority counsel with the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, deputy general counsel with the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community and he has worked in private practice on the Navajo Nation in Window Rock, Arizona.

Perry has a juris doctorate, a masters in business administration and a bachelor’s in electrical engineering all from Arizona State University. Perry is licensed to practice law in the Navajo Nation and Arizona.

Kim Barber, Administrative Service Officer

Kim Barber is Táchii’nii (Red Running Into The Water Clan), born for Níhoobáanii (Gray Streak Ends Clan), her maternal grandfather’s clan is Ashiihi (Salt Clan), and her paternal grandfather’s clan is Tó'aheedliinii (Water Flows Together Clan). She is from Bááháálí, N.M., and was raised by her grandmother, Julia Clah.

Barber earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. Her work experiences include fiscal and project work with the National Indian Child Welfare Association in Portland, Ore., and financial and research analysis with Tallsalt Asset Management in Scottsdale, Ariz.

 

Visiting Us

We welcome you to visit our offices.

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Visiting Washington, DC

We welcome you to visit our offices located at 750 First St., NE Suite 1010, Washington DC 20002. Contact our office to schedule a visit (202) 682-7390 or email at info@nnwo.org

We are conveniently located two blocks from Union Station Metro Stop on the Red Line.

 

What We Do

Learn more about what we do and how you can get involved.

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What We Do
  • Bills: View bill summaries, Navajo support/opposition, history of the bill, floor action, and votes.

  • Administrative policies: Find agency action items on issue areas, grant alerts, Federal register notices, national meetings, and consultation dates/announcements.

  • White papers: Read analyses of policies and issues affecting the Navajo Nation.

  • Budget numbers: View detailed breakdowns of budget items.

 

About Navajo

Learn more about the Navajo Nation

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Who We Are

The Navajo Nation is the largest tribal nation in the United States, with over 300,000 citizens. The Navajo Nation extends into the states of Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, encompassing over 27,000 square miles of unparalleled beauty. Diné Bikéyah, or Navajoland, is larger than 10 of the 50 states in the United States.

The reservation includes more than 14 million acres of trust lands, which are leased for various productive uses, including farming; grazing; oil, gas, and other mineral development; businesses; rights-of-way; timber harvesting; and housing.

Visitors from around the world are intrigued and mystified when they hear the Navajo language – so, too, were the enemy during World War II. Unknown to many, the Navajo language was used to create a secret code to battle the Japanese. Navajo men were selected to create codes and serve on the front line to overcome and deceive those on the other side of the battlefield. Today, these men are recognized as the famous Navajo Code Talkers, who exemplify the unequaled bravery and patriotism of the Navajo people.

 

 

Upcoming Events

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From the Blog

11/08/2014 - 12:37pm

Congress returns Nov. 12 after the elections.